Blog Post - Bespoke Wedding Ring Design
Bespoke Ring Design
12th February 2017
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Blog Post - Diamond Wedding Ring Settings

Ring Settings Explained

At Diamond Set Wedding Rings we concentrate on bringing our customers a range of wedding rings to suit all budgets. Consequently our wedding ring range consists of various settings, but in the main fall into the those described below.

Channel Setting

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A channel setting is a type of mounting in which diamonds or other gemstones are set into a channel made from two precious metal strips, the gemstones nestled side by side with no metal in between. The stones form a row that can run along a percentage of the band or the entire diameter of the ring.

Pros

  • Safe and Secure – Because gemstones are in a channel they are not easy to knock or fall out – they are literally trapped between the metal safe and secure.

Cons

  • Diamonds Less Visible – Since the diamonds or gemstones are held between metal walls they are less visible. As a consequence the setting produces less sparkle than say a prong set gemstone, where the setting is more open allowing more light to reflect and refract. However the setting is a classic and clean-looking style that will grace any wearer.
  • Hard to Resize – Since channel settings are precisely made the gemstones are
  • Cleaning – Channel settings can be hard to clean as you can’t reach into the channels, however an ultrasonic bath does wonder!

GRAIN Setting

A claw (or prong) setting consists of metal pins that hold a gemstone in place and is one of the most popular settings used for diamond rings. The number of claws used depends on the ring design but generally 4 claws are used to hold a stone in place.

Pros

  • Claws do not appreciably obscure the area of the stone to be held, leaving its surface visible. This allows light to enter the gemstone, particularly a diamond, so that the light is reflected and refracted to produce a sparkle and brilliance not always apparent with other settings.

Cons

  • The claws of a setting can snag on clothing or hair and therefore bend or break.
  • They can wear out or come loose with time – however in both these cases they are very easily repaired.
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CLAW or PRONG Setting

Claw Set Image Magnified

A claw (or prong) setting consists of metal pins that hold a gemstone in place and is one of the most popular settings used for diamond rings. The number of claws used depends on the ring design but generally 4 claws are used to hold a stone in place.

Pros

  • Claws do not appreciably obscure the area of the stone to be held, leaving its surface visible. This allows light to enter the gemstone, particularly a diamond, so that the light is reflected and refracted to produce a sparkle and brilliance not always apparent with other settings.

Cons

  • The claws of a setting can snag on clothing or hair and therefore bend or break.
  • They can wear out or come loose with time – however in both these cases they are very easily repaired.

PAVE Setting

A pave setting is made with gemstones seated in tiny holes drilled in the metal of the ring and held securely in place with small beads of metal. The beads trap each stone (similar to the grain setting) and constructed in row upon row the resultant setting is a surface paved with glittering diamonds or gemstones. A variation of this setting is a micro-pave setting – the main difference is between the size of the diamonds. Micro-pave settings are created with the small stones that are uniform in size and laid out over the surface. A traditional pave settings uses various diamond sizes to best cover the space.

Pros

  • The visual effect created by this type of setting is one of striking brilliance.
  • A great way to enhance the appearance of an engagement ring.

Cons

  • Can be difficult to resize given their construction.
  • Can be hard to repair if stones lost as matching existing stones can be a problem.
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